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UKIP's Nigel Farage to speak at Donald Trump rally

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Outgoing UKIP leader Nigel Farage is to address supporters of Donald Trump at a campaign rally in Mississippi later.

He will appear before 15,000 activists in Jackson, although it is unclear whether he will share the stage with the Republican presidential nominee.

Mr Farage told local radio in the state that the similarities between Brexit and the US election were "uncanny".

Mr Trump, who is trailing his rival Hillary Clinton in the opinion polls, backed the UK's exit from the EU.

In a tweet last week, Mr Trump said: "They will soon be calling me Mr Brexit."

Mr Farage, who attended the Republican convention in Cleveland last month, said he would not "fall into the trap" of personally endorsing Mr Trump in his quest to reach the White House, but added that he would not vote for Mrs Clinton "even if you paid me".


Analysis by Anthony Zurcher, BBC North America reporter

For Donald Trump, the British Brexit vote is a harbinger of a political revolution that will soon crash on to American shores.

The Republican nominee said as much as he stood on his Scottish golf course the day after the UK voted to leave the EU.

"People are angry all over the world," he said. "This will not be the last."

So, although the venue - deeply conservative Mississippi - is a bit unusual during the heat of a presidential campaign, Mr Trump possibly sharing the same stage with the man who spearheaded the Brexit vote should not be too surprising.

Mr Trump, in having Mr Farage recount his "Brexit story" to thousands of supporters on Wednesday night, probably hopes the tale of an upstart victory, despite seemingly long odds, will make his side forget about the opinion polls showing him trailing both nationally and in key battleground states.

During a radio interview on Wednesday, Mr Farage said he would tell Mr Trump's audience that the similarities between Brexit and the US election were "uncanny".

"They all said it couldn't happen," he said. "We were wasting our time. With a well-aimed stone, we hit that big Goliath and knocked it over."


Speaking on Super Talk Radio in the US state, Mr Farage said he had been part of a "political revolution" in the UK and there were the makings of a similar movement in the US.

He compared the federal government in Washington DC to the European Commission, saying many people felt it had become "its own country", and claimed the Democrat nominee epitomised the status quo.

"I'm going to say to people in this country that the circumstances, the similarities, the parallels, between the people that voted Brexit and the people that could beat Clinton in a few weeks' time here in America are uncanny.

"And if they want things to change, they've got to get up out of their chairs, go out, and fight for it. It can happen."

He suggested it did not matter that the political establishment, including many top Republicans, were shunning Mr Trump's campaign.

"Because there are millions of people out there who never voted for the Bushes, who never voted for the Clintons, who haven't voted for anybody, but who may, if they think in this presidential election they can actually change their lives and their communities, and that's the audience that matters."

Mr Farage, who is credited with securing the referendum on the UK's membership of the EU and helping to pull off the surprise Leave victory, is standing down next month as the party's figurehead after fulfilling his lifelong political ambition, but will remain as a member of the European Parliament.

UKIP donor and strategist Arron Banks, who is travelling with Mr Farage, suggested on social media that he would be having dinner with Mr Trump and was looking forward to the rally.

But Mr Farage's association with Mr Trump has not gone down well with some senior members of UKIP, including its sole MP Douglas Carswell, who tweeted "it's all going a bit South Thanet for the US Republicans" - a reference to Mr Farage's failed attempt to win a seat in the Kent constituency last year.

And Suzanne Evans, the former UKIP policy chief currently suspended by the party, suggested Mr Farage was trending on Twitter "for all the wrong reasons".

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wreichard
4 hours ago
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Made for each other.
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When You Lie on Resume But Still Get the Job

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Dc9 Dc9
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jepler
4 hours ago
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is that claude?
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wreichard
4 hours ago
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I'll grow into the role.
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The Good People of the Internet Love Leslie Jones

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The Good People of the Internet Love Leslie Jones
This #WCW is dedicated to you. The post The Good People of the Internet Love Leslie Jones appeared first on WIRED.
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wreichard
5 hours ago
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I just can't even. What a world where doing things like this against someone like this is called equality.
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superiphi
4 hours ago
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Idle, Bradford, United Kingdom
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Leslie Jones’ Website Hacked, Nudes Leaked

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524

After a tumultuous summer of battles against Ghostbusters critics and trolls on Twitter, the SNL comedian’s website has been hacked and vandalized as of this morning.

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wreichard
6 hours ago
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Lovely human beings, aren't they?
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superiphi
4 hours ago
They are feeling so threatened by this one funny clever woman :(
wreichard
4 hours ago
I just almost don't have the words anymore. It's like A Clockwork Orange.
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How a Guy From a Montana Trailer Park Overturned 150 Years of Biology - The Atlantic

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"Down a microscope, a lichen looks like a loaf of ciabatta"

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wreichard
6 hours ago
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Earth
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The Right Way

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The Right Way

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wreichard
10 hours ago
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Yeah...he's some kind of genius, all right.
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duerig
10 hours ago
I didn't think Adams could get any further off the rails, but this has proved me wrong. The 'mistakes were made', 'I regret if anyone was offended', etc. bogus apology isn't a brilliant strategy. It is a way for people to feel better about themselves when they are forced into an apology. A way to dissipate some of the cognitive dissonance. And it isn't some new. Almost every official apology follows this lame non-apology format because the powerful people involved can't bear to actually apologize. Oddly enough, this method of non-apology makes us feel better but is completely non-strategic. Studies have shown that people react more favorably when they see an actual apology rather than an awkward non-apology. But we can now see clearly that whenever there is a trade-off between strategy and feeling good, Trump always goes for whatever makes him feel good.
wreichard
8 hours ago
And Adams clearly thinks he's using this "strategy" too, which is even sadder.
wreichard
6 hours ago
That's really the part I can't stand--asserting that it's some novel and exciting way of thinking when in fact it's something that most 2-year-olds have mastered.
duerig
6 hours ago
That is true. At least when people were talking about how Obama was playing 12-dimensional chess, it was a little bit plausible because he is clearly a smart guy. With somebody like Trump, it is obvious that he is being driven by visceral urges. Even ascribing 'strategy' to him is a stretch. It is all stimulus-response.
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